Thy Will Be Done

Every week as we say the Lord’s Prayer, I think of the importance of the phrase “Thy will be done”. It clearly defines that our faith tells us that God is in control. Yet, there are few days that go by that someone does not ask to pray for someone who is sick or in crisis. We defy our own belief that God is in control and not us. We pray that someone will be healed or something bad will be avoided. Sometimes people will thank everyone for their prayers when someone is healed or things turned better than expected. These all bring conflict to those of faith. Such is the dilemma of faith. We do not have all the answers simply because we are mere mortals. We live by our faith.

Inconsistencies in people’s faith and what they say have dogged me since my early teens. My father died when I was twelve years old. He was forty-nine. I remember people coming to the house and overhearing them say “the good die young”. I could not understand what my grandmother could possibly have done to out-live her own son, if truly the good die young.

You might question why I write of this. I do so because there is much that we do not understand in life. God gave us minds to make decisions. He gave us the free will to make those decisions both good and bad. We all have made both. Sometimes we know instantly that we made bad decisions, other times it takes much longer. Sometimes it takes a lifetime. Those of us with faith know that because of God’s grace those bad decisions can be forgiven. However, that should not be a crutch to not attempt to do the right thing.

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To read the entire column pick up the July 11, 2018 edition of the Brunswick Times-Gazette.